Monday, March 9, 2015

Rumpled Ripple Scarf Pattern


Some people call it zig zag, some people call it ripple or wave, the new trendy name is chevron.  Whatever you call it, its a classic look that I just love.  Most often ripple patterns are made from simple basic stitches such as single crochet or double crochet so they are a great pattern for beginners that are ready for something more than row after row of the same stitch.  Some ripple patterns take motifs from other classic patterns, such as granny ripples or V stitch ripples.  This pattern is borrowing from the cobble stitch pattern.



The cobble stitch (sometimes called griddle stitch) is simply alternating between single crochet and double crochet.  As you come back again with row two you put double crochets into the single crochet and single crochets into the double crochet.  The resulting stitch is thick, textured, and solid.



I wanted to incorporate the texture of the cobble stitch into a ripple pattern for a scarf.  I love the result.  The scarf is solid, with no holes.  Textured but not taking away from the zig zag-ing chevrons.  A simple repeat of a single row so it works up quickly and easily.

This pattern uses US crochet terms.  I used Vanna's Choice Lion Brand yarn,  a medium (#4) worsted weight yarn and size I hook.  Please let me know if you have any questions about this pattern.



Cobble Stitch Ripple Pattern


Special Stitches


Cobble Pattern - alternating dc and sc (each segment of the cobble pattern will be 7 stitches long and start and end with double crochet.

Increase - sc, dc, sc all in the same st

Decrease (worked over 3 stitches)- insert hook into the st, yo, pull up a loop, skip the next st, insert hook into the next st, yo, pull up a loop, yo and pull through all three loops on the hook

Beginning of row decrease (worked over the first 2 stitches of each row starting with row 2)- insert hook into the st, yo and pull up a loop, yo and insert hook into the next st, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through 2 loops, yo and pull through all three loops on the hook - This stitch counts as a dc

End of row decrease (worked over the last 2 stitches of each row starting with row 2) - yo and insert the hook into the st, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through 2 loops, insert the hook into the next st, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through all three loops on the hook- This stitch counts as a dc


Pattern


Foundation chain: ch multiples of 18 -1 (17, 35, 53, 71 etc)  For my scarf I did ch 35 (2 repeats)

Row 1: dc in 3rd ch from hook (counts as the first dc in the cobble pattern), *work the cobble pattern for a total of 7 stitches up the side of the front mountain.  Increase in the next ch, work the cobble for a total of 7 stitches down the back side of the mountain, decrease over the next 3 stitches, repeat from * across.  Do not work the final decrease at the very end, just end with the 7 stitches down the back side of the last mountain. Ch 1 turn.

Row 2: Work beginning of row decrease over the first 2 stitches (counts as the first dc of the cobble pattern), *work the cobble pattern for 7 stitches up the front side of the mountain, increase, work cobble pattern for 7 stitches down the back side of the mountain, decrease over the next 3 st, repeat from * across.  Do not work the final decrease, instead work the end of row decrease over the last 2 stitches (will count as the last dc in the cobble pattern)

Row 3 and onward: Repeat row 2 changing colors as you like until your project is as long as  you like.  For my project I did 3 rows of each color before changing to the other color.  For the best results from this pattern I recommend using as least 2 colors.

To change colors:  

I find I get the best results if I change colors by finishing the last stitch of the row with the new color.  For this pattern that will be the End of Row Decrease stitch.  Work the stitch as normal but just before the final "yarn over and pull through all three loops on the hook" drop the working yarn to the back, and holding the new color yarn from the back work the final "yarn over and pull through all three loops on the hook" in the new yarn.  The tails from this color change will need to be woven into the work with a yarn needle at the end.


This pattern and video tutorial is my own creation.  Please link back to this original blog post or video when sharing.

3 comments:

  1. Love It!! Thank you soooo much!!! Great tutorial!

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  2. Am I able to change the cobble stitch pattern to a series of 3 stitches beginning & ending with D.C. Instead of the 7 in your pattern if so can you give me a stitch count for row one. I had a stroke & count of 3 seems to work best for me I don't get lost +I am new to crotchetiness so unable to recognize stitch patterns yet.. Thank U

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    Replies
    1. I am not sure I understand. IF=f you make it with 3 instead of 7 it would be very shallow ripples and it might just look like stripes, but try it. Do a small swatch and see if you like it

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